Daily Archives: March 11, 2010

A&F Sales in Steep Decline = YAY!!

Few retailers or labels make me as cranky as Abercrombie & Fitch which is why I don’t feel mean-spirited at all about being happy over the news that their sales are in a steep decline (woo-hoo!!) – see here and here. Not only are their “stale styles” way overpriced but the “American” lifestyle they stand for, promote, valorize, and export in their advertising and hiring practices (detailed in their “Appearance Policy”) is shamelessly racist, ableist, Islamophobic, gender normative, and heteronormative. See, for example, A&F chief executive Mike Jeffries’ obnoxious rationale of the retailer’s marketing strategy:

In every school there are the cool and popular kids, and then there are the not-so-cool kids. Candidly, we go after the cool kids. We go after the attractive all-American kid with a great attitude and a lot of friends. A lot of people don’t belong [in our clothes], and they can’t belong. Are we exclusionary? Absolutely. Those companies that are in trouble are trying to target everybody: young, old, fat, skinny. But then you become totally vanilla. You don’t alienate anybody, but you don’t excite anybody, either.

By the way, several years ago my intrepid and prolific co-blogger, the lovely Mimi Thi Nguyen, wrote a wonderful article about Abercrombie’s “Orientalist Kitsch” for the website, Pop Politics. Read it, read it!

Mimi’s addendum: And for more on the “appearance policy,” read Dwight McBride’s Why I Hate Abercrombie & Fitch: Essays on Race and Sexuality and the second chapter (also called “Why I Hate Abercrombie & Fitch”).

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LINKAGE: A Case for Legitimate Knock-offs

Charles Guislain, (another) teen blogger phenom

While some in the fashion media have been fixating on the growing importance of editorial coverage by young bloggers, relatively little has been said about a broader democratisation that’s happening in the fashion industry overall. For one thing, runway knock-offs — formerly a marginal industry — have become a borderline acceptable business practice, with stores such as Zara and Forever 21 building successful franchises by copycatting high fashion designs. In a sense, fast fashion collaborations such as Jimmy Choo for H&M or Rodarte for Target seem to legitimise this practice.

This is a quote from a recent article on the effects of fashion’s democratization from the website The Business of Fashion. Unfortunately, Ken Miller (the writer) doesn’t examine the changing meanings of knock-offs in this era of democratization or analyze which knock-offs are acceptable and which aren’t (and why) in the context of the emerging creative economy. Nonetheless, I’m intrigued by the relationship he’s suggesting between cheap chic fashion retailers like H&M and Target and the industry of legitimate knock-offs. Who authorizes this legitimacy? And what are the conditions of cultural legitimation?

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Filed under CHEAP CHIC, DEMOCRATIZATION OF FASHION