LINKAGE: Maria Bustillos at The Awl on the “Rodarte-MAC Fiasco”

DEATH WARMED OVER

And is it remotely possible that the Mulleavy sisters were trying to make a Guernica-like statement with their art? It is possible. Except… they’ve responded to the criticism by backpedaling furiously, which says something about the authenticity or seriousness of the original statement. So maybe it’s as simple as it looks: for Rodarte to exploit the catastrophe in Juárez in order to sell dresses and makeup demonstrates the dehumanizing effects of a debased, pathologically materialist society that has evidently gone clean off the rails. It would be easy to make that observation and dismiss the whole affair.

It’s worth asking, though: what is really going on when violence and horror are appropriated in order to create a consumer product? Because quite often the makers of newpapers, books and films are involved in creating consumer products based on real horror, just as these raggers tried (and failed) to do.

To take this comparison to an extreme, let’s consider the novel 2666, by the late Roberto Bolaño. This book, like the M·A·C Rodarte makeup, is both a comment on the Juárez femicides and a consumer product.

The Part About the Crimes, the fourth section of 2666, is something like a catalogue of the femicides, deliberately dry, without poetry. It’s more or less a list of bodies, with details of their height, their hair color, their clothes, written with a police-procedural air. It is punishing to read, the longest part of a long book, written in deliberately ugly, dull prose; this, from a man capable of the utmost inventiveness, wit and penetration. So what’s the difference between selling eyeshadow “inspired by” these terrible events, and writing a novel about them?

I submit that the difference is one of vanity. Rodarte was posing alongside the victims of Juárez, in a way, asking you to be shocked and titillated by the real live goth corpses, the disturbing juxtaposition of horror and beauty. But nothing was meant to change in Juárez or anywhere else as the result of this aestheticized rubbernecking. Bolaño, on the other hand, wasn’t asking anything at all (aside from asking that you read his book.)

2666 isn’t a call to arms. It offers nothing in the way of judgments, let alone solutions. There’s no self-aggrandizement, no style; the author of 2666 has erased himself right out of the picture, leaving just a mirror of the human condition for you to look in. This is a matter of telling the truth, a deliberate avoidance of the “sensational.” Where Rodarte attemped to steal the terrible emotions evoked by the fact that hundreds, maybe thousands of girls have been abducted, raped and murdered in Juárez, and trivialize (and then, “monetize”) those emotions by turning them into eyeshadow, Bolaño asks that you stop being horrified, and just look at the truth; nothing more. What happens afterward is left for us to determine.

I’m musing upon Maria Bustillo’s thoughts on art-making and politics in her AWL essay, “When PR Goes Wrong: The Rodarte-MAC Fiasco,” as Rodarte and MAC furiously issue statement after statement to recover their footing after the “Juarez” collaboration hit the fashion blogosphere. The latest missive declares that all profits from the M·A·C Rodarte collection will go to “a newly created initiative to raise awareness and provide on-the-ground support to the women and girls in Juarez.”

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2 Comments

Filed under FASHIONING RACE, (AD)DRESSING GENDER & SEXUALITY, FASHIONING THE HUMAN, FASHION-INDUSTRIAL-STATE COMPLEX

2 responses to “LINKAGE: Maria Bustillos at The Awl on the “Rodarte-MAC Fiasco”

  1. Maybe it’s just my conscience speaking, but I would feel incredibly wrong inside wearing clothes/makeup inspired by such violence as this. The whole Rodarte-Juarez situation makes me think of a line in the Asa song ‘Fire on the Mountian’, which goes “So you buy her a diamond/ That someone else died on/ Don’t you think there’s something wrong with that?”. Except that the people who sell blood diamonds aren’t capitalizing on the fact that people died so they could have their sparkly rocks.
    Whew. I hope that comment made sense, there.

  2. I’ve not seen the campaign, but I have read the Bolano. His novel made me AWARE of what was going on…in blissfully unaware middle America.

    On the other hand, my summer uniform–t-shirt, skirt, and rubber flip-flops looks remarkably like the homeless in after-earthquake Haiti. I think of this as a form of solidarity.

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